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A metropolitan university fit for Empire: the role of private benefaction in the early history of the London School of Economics and Political Science and Imperial College of Science and Technology, 1895–1930

Pellew, Jill (2012) A metropolitan university fit for Empire: the role of private benefaction in the early history of the London School of Economics and Political Science and Imperial College of Science and Technology, 1895–1930. In: History of Universities. Oxford University Press, Oxford. ISBN 9780199652068 ; E-ISBN: 9780191804694

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Abstract

This chapter examines the role of private benefaction in the early history of the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) and Imperial College of Science and Technology in the period 1895–1930. Both institutions, part of the University of London at the time, represent a turning point between the nineteenth-century model of university funding driven by civic pride and private initiative and twentieth-century ideas of government-funded higher education under the British Empire. The chapter focuses on two individuals who played important roles in the growth of LSE and Imperial College: Richard Burton Haldane, Viscount Haldane (1856–1928), and Sidney James Webb, Baron Passfield (1859–1947) and a member of the Fabian Society of London. It also considers early donors to LSE, the involvement of Webb and Haldane in what they called the ‘Charlottenburg’ scheme, and the legacy of Alfred Beit to Imperial College. Finally, it discusses the expansion of LSE after World War I.

Item Type: Book Section
Additional Information: Chapter 4.
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HG Finance
L Education > LB Theory and practice of education > LB2300 Higher Education
L Education > LF Individual institutions (Europe)
Date Deposited: 08 May 2017 13:47
Last Modified: 08 May 2017 14:23
URI: http://webbs.library.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/878

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